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"You have turned my life around"
 

I am 87 years old, with a problem of the prostate gland. Before I met Dr. Baum, I went to the bathroom every 30-60 minutes. After Dr. Baum's treatment on my prostate, I go only 5 times per day and only 1 time at night! You turned my life around. I am so very grateful!

-Sidney Daigle


I want to thank you for your due diligence. You saved my life. I highly recommend you!

-Dwight Bastian


Thank you Dr. Baum! Because of you I'm back in the "rodeo"!

-Gerald Wallace

 


Archive:

By contactus
January 03, 2012
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Did you know that watermakes up about 65% of a person’s total body weight.  After oxygen, there’s nothing more important to our survivalthan water.   This articlewill discuss the medicinal value of water and how much you need to maintaingood health and wellness.

 

Dehydration:  The primary mechanism thatwe maintain our proper hydration is through thirst.  Thirst serves two functions: 1) to regulate the volume ofwater within our bodies and 2) to control the concentration of various saltslike sodium and potassium within the body.  Fluid is lost through urination, skin loss by sweating,respiration, and a small amount in the feces, unless someone has diarrhea andthen a significant water loss may occur. If there is a loss of water by any of the above routes or if theconcentration of the salts in the blood stream increases, then the thirstmechanism kicks in, which is a strong drive to consume more fluids. 

How much water to drinkevery day?  You have heard from earlychildhood that you need to drink eight, eight ounce glasses a day.  This is probably a myth that isperpetuated many years ago from the Food and Nutrition Board, which estimatedthat the average total fluid loss each day was 64-80 ounces.  The Board did not mention that 20% ofour intake of fluid comes from food. Therefore, you don’t have to consume all of your total intake aswater. 

In addition to thirst, thecolor of your urine will serve as an indicator of your state of hydration.  If you are dehydrated, your urine willbe dark and yellow.  This is a signto increase your water consumption and the urine will turn to white or lightyellow, which is sign of adequate hydration.  If you are in a hot environment or participating in sportsand are sweating, you will want to check the color of urine when you completethe workout or sports event.  Ifthe color of your urine is dark, you know you are dehydrated and you need toconsume more fluids.  Athletes canlose up to two quarts of fluid through sweat each hour.  So whenever you are in warm or hotenvironment and you are losing lots of fluids by sweating, you must make aneffort to consume more fluids.

What about sports drinks:  A sportsdrink beverageis designed to help athletesrehydrate when fluids are depleted after training or competition. Ideally the sports drinks are intended to replacethe electrolytes that is lost in sweat during exercise and sportingevents.  Sports drinks usuallycontain a lower electrolyte concentration than found in sweat and can actuallyworsen the dilution of electrolytes. It is far easier to drink water and a salty snack.

Caffeine-Culprit or Cure ?   There is a myth that drinkswith caffeine are dehydrating.  Thetruth is that caffeine serves as a weak diuretic and promotes an increase inurine output and the fluid intake will more than compensate for the diureticeffect of the caffeine.  Like mostthings in life, anything in moderation is acceptable and this includescaffeine. 

What about bottled water?  Millions of Americans aredrinking bottled water. $22 billion is spent each year throughout the world onbottled water.  Bottledwater, although up to 1,000 times the price of tap water, may be no safer, orhealthier than tap water.  A gallonof bottled water is $3.84\gallon making it as expensive as gasoline.  In addition to the expense, 1.5 milliontons of plastic are used to bottle water and toxic chemicals can be releasedduring the manufacture and disposal of the bottles.  Studies have confirmed that microbes, pesticides, andsolvents have been detected throughout groundwater supplies, and havesubsequently found their way into bottles.

The Environmental ProtectionAgency checks the water that is consumed by the public.  In the United States the quality of thewater is very safe.  If you live inan area and drink well water, you will want to have the water checked forcontamination on a regular basis. A number of privatewater wells sampled in Louisiana showed potentially unsafe levels of arsenic,volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as secondarycontaminants in standard system tests for pH, hardness, alkalinity, dissolvedsolids and manganese. 

Bottom Line:  Water is truly the elixir of life.  Avoid dehydration by checking out thecolor of your pee.  For the most part,tap water tastes just as good as bottled water and is a whole lot cheaper.  Drink up!

By contactus
January 03, 2012
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If you are a man and if you are worried about infertility, don't try to Google the term “infertility” with a computer on your lap. A new experiment suggests that heat and\or radiation from a single Wi-Fi enabled laptop may be strong enough to cause cell damage in sperm. Researchers took samples of ejaculated semen and left them directly under a computer-stimulating holding a laptop directly above the male genitals. Within 4 hours, 25% of the sperm stop swimming, and 9% showed signs of DNA damage. A control group of sperm stored at the same temperature, but away from a computer, showed much less degradation. It is suspected that electromagnetic radiation in wireless devices positioned near the male reproductive organs may decrease human sperm quality.

Bottom Line: So, if you are trying to have a baby, use your desktop and not your laptop.

By contactus
January 03, 2012
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I am often asked about what tests or procedures men should have even if they are enjoying good health.  I am providing you with a suggested health checkups for men beginning at age 20-70. 

 

Age 20

Blood pressure every 2 years or annually if elevated

Cholesterol every 5 years

Dental exam annually

Vision examination every 2 years

Immunization (tetanus-diphtheria at age 19)

Sexually transmitted diseases

Skin cancer (look for marks or changes on your skin)

Testicular cancer-testicle self-examination

 

Age 30

Blood pressure every 2 years or annually if elevated

Cholesterol every 5 years

Dental health annually

Eye examination every 2 years

Immunizations (tetanus-diphtheria every 10 years)

Sexually transmitted diseases

Skin cancer (look for marks or changes on your skin)

Testicular cancer-testicle self examination

 

Age 40

Blood pressure every 2 years or annually if elevated

Cholesterol annually

Dental health annually

Diabetes (blood sugar test at age 45, or earlier if overweight or other risk factors are present)

Heart health (EKG every 4 years to screen for abnormalities)

Immunizations (tetanus-diphtheria every 10 years)

Prostate cancer (baseline PSA test if African American or there is a family history, age 50 otherwise)

Skin cancer (look for marks or changes on your skin)

 

Age 50

Blood pressure every 2 years or annually if elevated

Cholesterol annually

Colorectal cancer or annually

Dental health annually

Eye health every 2 years if you have vision problems

Heart health (EKG every 3 years to screen for abnormalities)

Immunizations (tetanus-diphtheria every 10 years, annual flu vaccine)

Osteoporosis (if risks factors are present)

Prostate cancer annually

Skin cancer (look for marks or changes on your skin)

 

Age 60

Abdominal ultrasound (if you have smoked over 100 cigarettes in your lifetime)

Blood pressure annually

Colorectal cancer annually

Dental health annually

Diabetes (every 3 years or as doctor recommends)

Eye health every 2 years if you have vision problems

Hearing annually

Heart health (EKG every 3 years to screen for abnormalities)

Immunizations (tetanus-diphtheria every 10 years, annual flu vaccine, shingles/herpes zoster vaccine once after age 60)

Osteoporosis if risks factors are present

Prostate cancer annually

Skin cancer (look for marks or changes on your skin)

 

Age 70+

Abdominal ultrasound (if you have smoked over 100 cigarettes in your lifetime)

Blood pressure annually

Cholesterol annually colorectal cancer annually dental health annually diabetes (every 3 years)

Immunizations (tetanus-diphtheria every 10 years, annual flu vaccine, pneumococcal vaccine after age 65)

Osteoporosis if risks factors are present

Prostate cancer annually

Skin cancer (look for marks or changes on your skin)

 

 

 

By contactus
December 02, 2011
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Eating fish at least once a week could help lower older patients' risk of developing dementia.
Those who ate baked or broiled -- but not fried -- fish on a weekly basis had a greater volume of gray matter in areas of the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease than people who didn't eat fish as often.  Preserving brain volume was also associated with lower rates of developing cognitive impairment.  Fish consumption benefits gray matter volume, potentially reducing the risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia long-term.

Although a National Institutes of Health panel decided last year that nothing conclusively prevents Alzheimer's disease, researchers continue to investigate whether a healthy diet, or specific components can have any beneficial effects.

A study of 260 people, mean age 71, were enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study between 1989 and 1990. At that time, they filled out questionnaires on dietary intake; 163 reported eating fish at least weekly, and some did so as often as four times a week.  All patients had an MRI 10 years later to assess brain volume, and then had follow-up cognitive testing between 2002 and 2003.

The researchers found that patients who ate fish at least once a week had greater volume in the frontal lobes and the temporal lobes, including the hippocampus and the posterior cingulate gyrus (these are the areas responsible for memory and learning, which are severely affected in Alzheimer's disease.

Five years after the MRI, they found that 30.8% of patients who had low fish intake had developed mild cognitive impairment or dementia, compared with just 3.2% of those who had the highest fish intake and the greatest preservation of brain volume.

They also saw that 47% of patients with brain atrophy who didn't eat fish had abnormal cognition five years later compared with 28% of those who ate more fish and had more gray matter volume.

In further analyses, the researchers found that mean scores for working memory -- a function severely impaired in Alzheimer's disease -- were significantly higher among those who ate fish weekly.

This simple lifestyle choice of eating more fish increases the brain's resistance to Alzheimer's disease, potentially via a few mechanisms: Fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which can help increase blood flow to the brain and can also act as an antioxidant, thereby reducing inflammation, he said.

Omega-3s may also prevent the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain.

Fatty fish like salmon have more omega-3s, while smaller fish, such as cod, have less.

It would be safe to say that this study provides another hypothesis about the possible beneficial effect of a diet rich in fish ingredients and a delay of cognitive functioning like memory loss.

Bottom Line: In this study, eating fish at least once a week appeared to help lower older patients' risk of developing dementia.

This blog has been modified from MedPage: http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/RSNA/29957

By contactus
December 02, 2011
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Apparently, there's another reason to quit smoking: A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that smoking at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence as well as an increased risk of dying of prostate cancer. This is the first large-scale study to demonstrate that smoking increases the risk of dying of prostate cancer.

Researchers followed 5,366 men diagnosed with prostate cancer over two decades. Of these, 1,630 died -- 524 due to prostate cancer and 416 due to cardiovascular disease --and 878 had recurrences of their prostate cancer after treatment. When compared with men who had never smoked, those who were smoking at the time of diagnosis had an approximately 60 percent greater risk of both prostate cancer recurrence after treatment and death due to prostate cancer. Furthermore, the greater the number of years spent smoking, the greater the risk of death due to prostate cancer.

On a positive note, the study demonstrated that participants who had quit smoking for 10 or more years experienced prostate-related death and recurrence rates similar to those of nonsmokers.

African Americans have the highest incidence of prostate cancer, followed by white Americans. Although the cause of prostate cancer remains unknown, risk factors include age, family history, race and hormone levels -- with advancing age being the most notable risk factor.

The American Cancer Society recommends that men at average risk discuss prostate cancer screening with their doctor at age 50. For African Americans and men with a family history of prostate cancer, the society recommends having the discussion even earlier—starting at 40 to 45 years of age.

Bottom Line: As many of us already know, smoking is linked to a variety of deadly diseases, including cardiovascular disease and lung cancer. For multiple reasons, if you're a smoker, it's always a good idea for you to quit. This study suggests that if you have prostate cancer and you smoke, it makes sense to quit for this reason, too. And if you're at increased risk for prostate cancer, it's smart to quit now in case you’re later diagnosed with the disease

 

This blog was modified from the Johns Hopkins Health Alert, https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/133f97bc6f953f17

Research on Smoking and Prostate Cancer





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