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I am 87 years old, with a problem of the prostate gland. Before I met Dr. Baum, I went to the bathroom every 30-60 minutes. After Dr. Baum's treatment on my prostate, I go only 5 times per day and only 1 time at night! You turned my life around. I am so very grateful!

-Sidney Daigle


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Archive:

Posts for: February, 2011

By contactus
February 03, 2011
Category: Constipation
Tags: Constipation  

Few of us like or are comfortable talking about our problems with urination or with bowel movements. However, when these functions go awry, all havoc takes place. Though not usually serious, constipation can be a concern. This article will discuss constipation and what can be done to resolve the issue.
Almost everyone gets constipated at some time during his or her life. It affects approximately 2% of the population and the elderly are more commonly affected.
What Is Constipation?
Constipation occurs when bowel movements become difficult or less frequent. The normal length of time between bowel movements ranges widely from person to person. Some people have bowel movements three times a day; others, only one or two times a week. The longer the interval between bowel movements, the harder the stool becomes and the more difficult to pass.
You are considered constipated if you have two or fewer bowel movements in a week.

What Causes Constipation?
Constipation is usually caused by inadequate water intake. Inadequate fiber in the diet. inadequate activity or exercise or immobility, eating large amounts of dairy products, resisting the urge to have a bowel movement, which is sometimes the result of pain from hemorrhoids, overuse of laxatives or stool softeners.
How Is Constipation Diagnosed?
Most people do not need extensive testing to diagnose constipation. Only a small number of patients with constipation have a more serious medical problem. If you have constipation for more than two weeks, you should see a doctor so he or she can determine the source of your problem and treat it. If constipation is caused by colon cancer, early detection and treatment
How Can I Prevent Constipation?
Fiber and water help the colon pass stool. Eat a well-balanced diet with plenty of fiber. Good sources of fiber are fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, legumes, and whole-grain bread and cereal (especially bran). Drink 1 1/2 to 2 quarts of water each day. Avoid milk, as dairy products may be constipating for them. Moving around and exercise tends to promote bowel regularity.
Treatment
If you are constipated, try the following: Drink two to four extra glasses of water a day (unless fluid restricted). Add fruits and vegetables and fiber to your diet. If needed, use a very mild stool softener or laxative (such as Peri-Colace or Milk of Magnesia). Do not use laxatives for more than two weeks without calling your doctor, as laxative overuse can aggravate your symptoms.
Call your doctor if: You have blood in your stool; you have severe pain with bowel movements; or your constipation has lasted more than two weeks.

Bottom Line: Constipation is a common problem. Most people can prevent constipation with diet and moderate exercise.


By contactus
February 03, 2011
Category: urinanalysis
Tags: urinanalysis  

Most of us are uncomfortable talking about our waste products, urine and feces. However, changes in the color and odor may signify disease that can be treated or prevented. This article will review causes of discoloration of urine and when there is a change in the odor of urine.
For hundreds of years doctors have looked at urine as a barometer of what is happening in the body. The urine can tell what you have been eating, how much fluid you are consuming, and what diseases you may have. Early doctors even tasted the urine of their patients in order to diagnose their medical conditions. Fortunately, we have made progress and a simple urinalysis can make this determination in seconds.

Urine is an important part of the body's regulation process. Its job is to remove the extra water and wastes that the kidneys filter out of the blood. The urine is there primarily to get rid of toxins or things that would otherwise build up in the body that would be bad for the body.
When you notice that your urine has changed color, or there's a strange odor emanating from the toilet, the cause might be something as harmless as what you had for dinner such as asparagus. It also might be a sign of a more serious condition, such as an infection or cancer.
Color Changes
Urine normally varies from pale yellow to deep amber, depending on the concentration of the urine, which is determined by the amount of fluid you consume. Darker urine is usually a sign that you're not drinking enough water. Correction is as simple as consuming more liquids, especially water.
The opposite is also true. If your urine is very pale, it means that you're either drinking a lot of fluid, or you're taking a diuretic or water pill which is a drug that forces the body to eliminate excess water.
Urine can turn a rainbow of colors, and an unusual hue isn't necessarily cause for alarm. Certain medications can turn the urine fluorescent green or blue, the carotene in carrots can tint it orange, and vitamins can give it a yellow hue. Pyridium, a medication, which is used to treat burning on urination, will turn the urine orange-red.
Seeing red is typically a sign that there is blood in the urine, but before you panic, know that a little blood can produce a dramatic color change. Just like a drop of food coloring will add color to a large volume of food or fluids, it only takes one drop of blood to turn an entire toilet bowl red.
Red urine is usually an ominous sign and can indicate an infection or maybe even cancer. Red blood is a real warning sign and should prompt you to see your doctor or urologist, a doctor who specializes in disease of the kidneys and bladder.

Odor Changes
Urine normally doesn't have a very strong smell. If your urine has a foul odor, you could have an infection or urinary stones, which can create an ammonia-like odor. Diabetics might notice that their urine smells sweet, because of excess sugar.
Some foods can also change urine odor. Asparagus is among the most notorious. What people are smelling when they eat asparagus is the breakdown of a sulfur compound called methyl mercaptan (the same compound found in garlic).
How Often Do You Need to Go?
How often you need to go can be as important an indicator of your health as the color or smell of your urine. Most people take bathroom breaks about six to eight times a day, but you might go more or less depending on how much fluid you drink. If you're constantly feeling the urge to go and it's not because you're not drinking extra fluid, causes can include:
Overactive bladder (when you gotta go, you gotta go!), urinary tract infection, Interstitial cystitis (painful urination without an infection), prostate gland enlargement, and diabetes.

The opposite problem, not going to the bathroom enough, can occur when there is a blockage or infection. Or, it can be the result of bad bathroom habits. Some people -- especially teachers, surgeons, and anyone else who doesn't have time for regular bathroom breaks throughout the day -- tend to hold it in.
Delaying urination can also cause problems. The bladder can develop a chronic over-distension and will not empty completely. As a result urine is left in the bladder and can be a source for developing a urinary tract infection.
Develop good bathroom habits.
Drink whenever you're thirsty, but certainly increase your fluids before going outside in the hot summer sun or before exercising.
If you're getting up during the night to use the bathroom, stop drinking three to four hours before bedtime. Limit caffeine, which can irritate the lining of the bladder. Also watch your intake of alcohol, which can have an effect similar to a diuretic.
Finally, don't hold it in. Don't delay answering the call of the rest room. Your bladder will thank you.
Bottom Line: Pay attention to the color and odor of your urine. If there is a change, contact your physician.


By contactus
February 03, 2011
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Back pain   sciatica  

Can Your Wallet Cause Back Pain?
February 1, 2011 by neilbaum
Today I was providing care for a chiropracter. I turned my back on him and he asked me if I had a wallet in my back pocket of my scrub suit? When I told him it was he said, "That keeps me in business!" I asked him to explain and he said that the thick wallets in men who sit most of the day on their buttocks and on their wallets causes a discrepancy that can contribute to back pain. I thought that was absurd and then I Googled the topic on the Internet and found this article from the New York Times in 2006 by Anahad O'Conner which confirmed his comment.

THE CLAIM Keeping a wallet in your back pocket can cause sciatica. 

Ms. O'Conner said that a wallet stuffed with business cards or scraps of paper might seem like more of an eyesore than a health hazard.

But one old bromide holds that a thick wallet -- or even one that's not so thick -- can harm the lower back for those sit on it for too long. And while experts says the fears are probably exaggerated, the wallet can definitely carry some hazards.

Although it was popularized by an episode of the "Seinfeld" series in the 1990's, the phenomenon was first described in a brief article in The New England Journal of Medicine in 1966, when credit cards were beginning to proliferate.

The report, about a lawyer who suffered aches and pains in the left leg, not far from a wallet growing thick with charge cards, referred to the condition as "credit-carditis."

Although that term never quite caught on, doctors say the condition has become increasingly common. Its onset is gradual, caused by an object that presses on the piriformis muscle in the buttocks, which is connected to the sciatic nerve, which runs down the leg.

Over time, a person can develop radiating pain in the back and hip area.

"Just the other day, I had to tell one patient with back pain to remove at least 20 years of stored data from his wallet," said Dr. Gerard P. Varlotta of the New York University School of Medicine.

Wallets are not the only culprits. Numerous case reports have linked the condition to various back-pocket objects like large handkerchiefs and golf balls.

THE BOTTOM LINE -- Keeping a thick wallet or object in the back pocket can gradually cause sciatica.

 


Getting Up At Night To Pee Doesn't Have To Be

(Reuters Health) - A new study finds that one in five U.S. men have to get up at least twice a night to empty their bladders -- which for some could signal an underlying medical problem or even contribute to poorer health.
Known as nocturia, those frequent overnight trips to the bathroom can be a sign of a health condition, ranging from a urinary tract infection to diabetes to chronic heart failure. In men, a benign enlargement of the prostate can also be a cause.
For some people, the constant sleep disruptions can themselves cause problems -- contributing to depression symptoms or, particularly in older adults, falls.
On the other hand, getting up during the night to urinate can also be normal. If you drink a lot of fluids close to bedtime, for example, don't be surprised if your bladder wakes you up at night.
Nocturia also becomes more common with age. Part of that is related to older adults' higher rate of medical conditions. But it could also result from a decrease in bladder capacity that comes with age.
The researchers found that men age 20 and up, 21 percent said they had gotten up at least twice per night to urinate.
Nocturia was more common among African-American men (30 percent) than those of other races and ethnicities (20 percent). Not surprisingly, it also increased with age: Just 8 percent of men ages 20 to 34 reported it, compared with 56 percent of men age 75 or older.
Other factors linked to an increased risk of nocturia included prostate enlargement, a history of prostate cancer, high blood pressure and depression.
Nocturia can also be a side effect of some medications, such as diuretics used to treat high blood pressure. This study did not have information on men's medication use.
Avoiding caffeine and a large fluid intake at night may help as may other lifestyle tactics, like adjusting your sleep habits.
One recent study of 56 older adults with nocturia found that lifestyle changes -- including fluid restriction, limiting any excess hours in bed, moderate daily exercise, and keeping warm while sleeping -- helped more than half of the patients significantly cut down their overnight trips to the bathroom.
There are also medications available specifically for overactive bladder and nocturia. Those include a synthetic version of a hormone, anti-diuretic hormone, that keeps the body from making urine at night, a drug that blocks the ability of the bladder muscles to contract, and antidepressants that make it harder to urinate by increasing tension at the bladder neck.
The bottom line for men is that bothersome nocturia is something they should bring up to their doctor.
SOURCE: bit.ly/fGZKNN Journal of Urology, online January 19, 2011



Thursday, January 20, 2011


Once again I love it when a mystery is revealed, or at least partially explained.
A case study in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine helped confirm the importance of vitamins to your sleep.
But a recent case study has shown that a patient with severe sleepiness and a vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation improved daytime sleepiness dramatically. The patient was a 28 year old female. She was suffering for about four months with excessive sleepiness. Her symptoms started slowly and continued to progress. She kept a standard bedtime between 10 and 11 pm, and she reported falling asleep within minutes. She would wake at 7:30 am and reported that she did not think that she was sleeping poorly. She would get her kids ready for school and then be back in bed by 8am until noon. She would then nap from 4 pm to 7 pm. She reported about 14 hours of sleep per day.
Her sleep study showed no signs of sleep apnea or other sleep disorder. During her clinic visit she showed no signs of narcolepsy, depression or anxiety. Her next day nap study was unremarkable. She reported muscle fatigue and pain, as well as headaches. Her lab work showed a thyroid in the low but normal range and she had low levels of vitamin D.
She was started on a vitamin D supplementation at 50,000 units once per week (IV) and within 2 weeks she started to see a decrease in her sleepiness and fatigue.
Vitamin D is actually considered a fat soluble hormone that can be received in foods (dietary sources and fish) or is self-manufactured by the skin after exposure to UVB light. A vitamin D deficiency has been noticed as a global issue and recently found in underserved populations, patients in northern latitudes, people with darker skin tones, the elderly, obese and pregnant or lactating women. Also very common in areas with a high degree of sunshine (this seems counter-intuitive, but think about all that sunblock!). Recent studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to metabolic syndrome, muscle pain, and even type 2 diabetes.
So why do we think it helped her sleepiness? It is really hard to say, but I have seen this in some of my patients. It could be linked to a decrease in sleep disturbing pain. Or vitamin D may be something that will help decrease a person's drive for sleep. Only more research in this exciting new area can tell us.
Check with your doctor about vitamin supplementation. We all work hard, and eating right isn't always easy - and even when we do, we may not get what we need from the food we eat. Our bodies actually make vitamin D, but we have to get enough sunlight to make that happen effectively.
Sweet Dreams,
Michael J. Breus, PhD
The Sleep Doctor™

http://bit.ly/g006uz