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"You have turned my life around"
 

I am 87 years old, with a problem of the prostate gland. Before I met Dr. Baum, I went to the bathroom every 30-60 minutes. After Dr. Baum's treatment on my prostate, I go only 5 times per day and only 1 time at night! You turned my life around. I am so very grateful!

-Sidney Daigle


I want to thank you for your due diligence. You saved my life. I highly recommend you!

-Dwight Bastian


Thank you Dr. Baum! Because of you I'm back in the "rodeo"!

-Gerald Wallace

 


Archive:

Posts for: April, 2011

The Particulars: More than 70 million people throughout the world run recreationally or competitively. Recently, there has been controversy about whether or not frequent runners should stretch before running or not at all.
Data Breakdown:Of 2,729 runners who run 10 or more miles per week and participated in a study, 1,366 were randomized to a stretch group, while 1,363 were randomized to a non-stretch group prior to running. Runners in the stretch group stretched their quadriceps, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius/soleus muscle groups. Stretching before running neither prevented nor caused injury. The most significant risk factors for injury included a history of chronic injury or having suffered an injury in the past 4 months, higher BMI, and switching pre-run stretching routines. The risk for injury was the same for men and women, regardless of whether or not they were high- or low-mileage runners, and across all age groups.
Bottom Line: Stretching before running does not appear to prevent or cause injury in people who run 10 or more miles per week.  


When Things Aren’t Right “Down There”-When Women Should Call Their Doctor*
For most women, a couple of irregular menstrual cycles or an occasional yeast infection are just a part of life -- nothing that time or simple treatment won’t cure.  However, there are a few symptoms that warrant a call to the doctor.  This article will cover when you should call your doctor for problems "down there"?
1. Pelvic Pain
Pain at the time of ovulation, is referred to as Mittelschmerz.  However, if you have pelvic pain that persists or doesn’t ease with simple home treatment, call your doctor.
When a woman has chronic pelvic pain, doctors will check for benign uterine fibroids and endometriosis. They will also look for pelvic inflammatory disease, which usually appears as a triad of pelvic pain, vaginal discharge, and fever.
In addition, abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding may signal an ectopic pregnancy, in which a fertilized egg implants outside of the uterus.  This is a medical emergency and you need to visit an emergency room if you can’t reach your doctor.
Ovarian cancer is another condition that can cause pelvic pain.  The symptoms of bloating, pelvic pressure and frequency of urination for more than two weeks is a potential sign that you should be checked for a possible ovarian cancer.
2. Irregular Bleeding
If you’re not on any kind of birth control and you have irregular bleeding that lasts for more than a month or two, you should always be checked.  Irregular bleeding includes: periods that last longer than normal, bleeding mid-month, having two periods per month, bleeding after sex, and other unusual patterns.  Abnormal bleeding may stem from multiple causes that aren’t serious, among them, perimenopause or uterine fibroids or polyps.
If you bleed every time after sex, that may indicate that the cervix is being easily irritated especially if there’s some infection of the cervix.  Sexually transmitted diseases, such as gonorrhea or chlamydia, can cause cervical lesions that bleed with sex.
If you’re postmenopausal, be especially vigilant about any vaginal bleeding; it’s a potential sign of uterine cancer. Uterine cancer, compared to ovarian cancer, is extremely treatable. It’s very curable because it’s generally found in an early stage and it has an early warning sign, which is postmenopausal bleeding.
3. Abnormal Vaginal Discharge
Abnormal symptoms include a strong odor; an unusually large amount of discharge; accompanying itching, burning, or irritation; unusual color; or blood in the discharge.
4. Vaginal Dryness
Vaginal dryness in postmenopausal women or vaginal atrophy can cause spotting after intercourse. Because older women have less estrogen, their vaginal tissue thins or atrophies and becomes dry and irritated.  Not only does vaginal dryness make sex painful, but vaginal thinning also leaves women more susceptible to infections and can contribute to urinary incontinence.
Most women can find relief with estrogen creams, rings, or tablets that are applied or inserted directly into the vagina.
5. Sores or Lumps
Sores in the genital area may point to herpes, a sexually transmitted disease, or cancer. Symptoms of cancer of the vulva include unusual lumps, wart-like bumps, or red, flat sores that don’t heal. Sometimes, the flat sores turn scaly or discolored.
Bottom Line: Most problems “down there” are innocuous but you should know when to call your doctor.  These are the five most common symptoms that need your attention and that of your doctor. 


 

By Charles Bankhead, Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Published: March 30, 2011
Reviewed by Dori F. Zaleznik, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston and
Dorothy Caputo, MA, RN, BC-ADM, CDE, Nurse Planner

 

Almost a third of older men with limited life expectancy continue to have unnecessary PSA tests.
Screening rates increased steadily after age 54, peaked among men ages 70 to 74 and then declined thereafter. However, 30.7% of men with a high probability of dying from prostate cancer within five years continued to be screened, Michael W. Drazer, BS, of the University of Chicago, and colleagues reported online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Moreover, a fourth of men ages 85 and older underwent PSA screening, the same proportion as men ages 50 to 54, Drazer and co-authors noted in their analysis of National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data from 2000 to 2005.

"Excessive screening for prostate cancer in elderly men who have limited life expectancies in the U.S. results in unnecessary anxiety, diagnoses, overtreatment, treatment-related morbidity, and healthcare expenditures without meaningful clinical benefit," the investigators concluded.

I suggest that the merits and limitations of PSA should be discussed with patients considering prostate cancer screening, particularly in older men and in those with short estimated life expectancies.

Deciding when to stop PSA testing constitutes a major part of the screening controversy. The American Urological Association and the American Cancer Society recommend screening for men who have an estimated life expectancy of at least 10 years, the authors noted.

So what advice do I have for men over age 70?  If you are active, exercise regularly, have normal blood pressure and no other significant co-morbid conditions like diabetes, heart disease, or other cancers, then you should consider a PSA test every year or every other year.  However, if you have high blood pressure, heart disease or diabetes and your life expectancy is less than 10 years, then you will probably die WITH prostate cancer and not from prostate cancer.  In the latter situation, it is not necessary to have annual PSA testing.   

 


Meg Farris, the health and science reporter at WWL, did a nice segment on the use of lasers for treating the enlarged prostate gland.  For more information go to:

http://bit.ly/f2wYjR