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"You have turned my life around"
 

I am 87 years old, with a problem of the prostate gland. Before I met Dr. Baum, I went to the bathroom every 30-60 minutes. After Dr. Baum's treatment on my prostate, I go only 5 times per day and only 1 time at night! You turned my life around. I am so very grateful!

-Sidney Daigle


I want to thank you for your due diligence. You saved my life. I highly recommend you!

-Dwight Bastian


Thank you Dr. Baum! Because of you I'm back in the "rodeo"!

-Gerald Wallace

 


Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a serious disorder that affects millions of men as many as 30 million Americans. With the aging of the US population, ED will become even more prevalent. Erectile dysfunction can profoundly impact quality of life and, with the aging trends of the United States population, will become an increasingly important public health problem The likelihood of developing ED increases significantly with age, but this is not an old man's disease as it also affects younger and middle aged men as well. Perhaps there are thousands of men in the New Orleans community who suffer from this condition.

The introduction of Viagra in 1998 has increased awareness of ED and the number of men seeking treatment. Still, it is estimated that the majority of men with ED fail to request treatment, due largely to the discomfort and embarrassment in discussing sexual issues with their physicians.

And, among those who do seek treatment and receive Viagra, one in three men do not have a satisfactory response. These are cases of drug-resistant erectile dysfunction, or DRED. Some men find using the drug every time they want to have sexual relations inconvenient, or they don't like the occasionalheadaches and other side effects. What's worse is when a man tries the drug, it doesn't work, and he becomes depressed and it affects his marriage and other relationships. That's the bad news. The good news is that there is a cure for ED, including drug-resistant ED, that works for nearly all men who suffer from the tragedy of the bedroom.

Common diseases that account for about 70% of cases of ED are:

  • diabetes
  • kidney disease
  • chronic alcoholism
  • multiple sclerosis
  • atherosclerosis (or hardening and narrowing of the arteries)
  • vascular disease (disease of the blood vessels)

ED is also caused by spinal cord and brain injuries; pelvic trauma; and surgery of the colon, prostate gland, bladder or rectum. ED is common following surgery for prostate removal, particularly when nerve-sparing techniques have not been used. Also, about one-third of men experience ED after radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

ED affects between 35 and 60% of men with diabetes. Men with diabetes are three times more likely to experience ED than those without.

Use of certain prescription drugs or illegal drugs accounts for up to 25% of ED cases. More than 200 prescription drugs may cause or contribute to impotence, including drugs for high blood pressure and other heart medications and antidepressants.

Excessive alcohol intake and smoking have also been associated with ED. Hormone disorders such as deficiency of the male hormone testosterone account for fewer than 5% of ED cases.

ED sometimes has psychological causes depression, guilt, worry, stress and anxiety can all contribute to loss of libido and ED. And there are usually a emotional implications to any case of ED some experts estimate in as many as 80% of cases.

Success of the various treatments varies widely. Although the manufacturer of Viagra claims that it is effective in 82% of cases, studies have documented a high percentage of men who do not respond to the drug. Response seems to be somewhat linked to the underlying cause of ED. For example, men with diabetes are less likely to have a positive response than those with high blood pressure.

This leaves a significant population who require other more invasive options for the treatment of ED. Another group for whom alternative therapies should be considered are those men who are taking nitrates for their angina. For these 6 million men, Viagra is strictly contraindicated, since the two medications can cause a severe drop in blood pressure. Assuming that their cardiovascular fitness level is sufficient to engage in sexual activity, these men are ideal candidates for other treatment options.

Today we have an opportunity for men who have been successfully treated for ED talk to other men who want to learn more about the options in treating and curing their drug resistant ED. It's all part of a new public education program, called Straight Talk About ED. This program is available through Tulane and at my office. Meetings with the Straight Talk educators are held at the urologist's office.

The program features men who have been treated with penile implants, vacuum devices, injection therapy and other options to drug therapy. Those men will be talking with other men and their partners who are living with DRED. These Straight Talk educators have "one-on-one" discussions with men about their ED issues, and help men to overcome their fears and hesitations about seeking help for the very private matter of maintaining their sexual health. Men living with DRED can get help by meeting with their peers. Men no longer have to live in fear that their ED problems can't be solved.

ED has been underestimated as an indicator of a man's overall health. Just like blood pressure monitors and cholesterol blood tests, the penis is another barometer we can use to measure a man's health as ED can be an indicator of serious health problems, including heart disease, hypertension and diabetes.

To learn more, men or their partners are encouraged to call 800.600.7111 x233 or visit www.healthinform.net for a free information package.